Atlas of Prince Eugene

Alternate Titles:

Atlas des Prinzen Eugen

Facsimile edition
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Codiology

Alternate Titles

Atlas des Prinzen Eugen

Type
Extent / Format

/ 57.0 x 38.0 cm

Origin
Date
1662-1678
Genre
Language
Artist / School

Printer: Joan Blaeu
Engraver: Matthäus Merian of Basel
Illustrator: Dirck Jansz van Santen

Illustrations

35 views and 8 maps in original size of Atlas Blaeu - van der Hem from the Austrian National Library Vol. 1

Former owners

Laurens van der Hem
Prince Eugen of Savoye

Short description

The volume at hand of the 50-volume Atlas of Prince Eugene concerns Switzerland and assembles gorgeous views of city- and landscapes as well as interesting cartographical depictions that give a marvelous glimpse of 17th century Switzerland! Laurens van der Hem compiled his famous atlas in the years 1662-1678. He collected and integrated sheets from outstanding artists of his time as well as older works. Roelandt Savery, Willem Schellinks, Jan Haeckert, Adriaen Matham and Frederic de Moucheron, Wenzel Hollar, Matthäus Merian, and Jacob Hoefnagel are only a few names of the famous people whose engravings were incorporated into the work.

Facsimile editions available

Description

A Princely Atlas

This treasure of the Austrian National Library is named after Prince Eugene of Savoy. The Austrian noblemen and general acquired the famous Atlas Blaeu – van der Hem, which had been in the possession of the Amsterdam patrician Laurens van der Hem, in the 18th century, and has been known as the Atlas of Prince Eugene ever since. The 50-volume atlas was compiled between 1662 and 1678 as a comprehensive geographical overview and subsequently came to be considered as an important attraction for the city of Amsterdam. Matthäus Merian was involved as a copper engraver, his etchings were colored by the “master colorist” Dirk Jansz van Santen. The volume at hand concerning Switzerland assembles gorgeous views of city- and landscapes as well as interesting cartographical depictions that give a marvelous glimpse of 17th century Switzerland!

Switzerland in Impressive Engravings

An impressive waterfall cascades amidst a rocky gorge and a few small houses. Lake Lucerne stretches out in the middle of a terrifically green landscape, and the backdrop of the city of Basel rises up majestically before the blue firmament. The Swiss volume of the famous Atlas Blaeu – van der Hem collects simultaneously gorgeous and informative maps and views. Individual regions of Switzerland are portrayed, as well as cityscapes or views of famous tourist attractions and depictions of natural spectacles.

The Treasure of an Amsterdam Patrician

This 17th century geographic treasure is stored today among the rich collections of the Austrian National Library. It is a famous atlas – a 50-volume collected work of old city- and landscapes – that was in the possession of the Amsterdam patrician Laurens van der Hem (1621-1678). This Atlas Blaeu – van der Hem was considered to be one of the symbols of the city of Amsterdam. Countless visitors came to wonder at it, the Medici among them, who would have gladly bought the compendium. Nonetheless, it remained in Amsterdam. In 1736, the work was finally sold to the Prince Eugene of Savoy (1663-1736) by the Van der Hem family. The compendium reached Vienna by courtesy of this famous patron of the arts and Hapsburg general in the Great Turkish War and the War of the Spanish Succession. The atlas, now named after Prince Eugene, was transferred by Emperor Charles VI to the court library, the modern Austrian National Library.

Matthäus Merian’s Image of Switzerland

Laurens van der Hem compiled his famous atlas in the years 1662-1678. He collected and integrated sheets from outstanding artists of his time as well as older works. Roelandt Savery, Willem Schellinks, Jan Haeckert, Adriaen Matham and Frederic de Moucheron, Wenzel Hollar, Matthäus Merian, and Jacob Hoefnagel are only a few names of the famous people whose engravings were incorporated into the work. The copperplates by Matthäus Merian the Younger (1621-1687) were of great significance for the Swiss volume. The marvelous views were colored by Dirck Jansz van Santen, who was already praised as a master colorist among his contemporaries. This volume concerning Switzerland comprises 35 views and eight maps with detailed geographic information. It gives, as such, a unique overview of 17th century Switzerland!

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