Treatise on Hunting and Fishing - Oppiano, Cynegetica

Cod. Gr.Z.479] (=881) - Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana (Venice, Italy)

Alternate Titles:

Tratado de Caza y Pesca - Oppiano, Cynegetica, Traktat der Jagd und Fischerei, Traité de Chasse et de Pêche, Trattato di caccia e pesca, Tratado de Caça e Pesca

Facsimile edition
Our price
Info / Order
Please log in!
Add to compare list
Please log in!
Add to wish list
Please log in!
Add to my stock

Codiology

Alternate Titles

Tratado de Caza y Pesca - Oppiano, Cynegetica
Traktat der Jagd und Fischerei
Traité de Chasse et de Pêche
Trattato di caccia e pesca
Tratado de Caça e Pesca

Type
Extent / Format

150 pages / 23.5 x 19.0 cm

Origin
Date
11th century
Style
Genre
Language
Artist / School

Author: Oppiano of Apamea (3rd century)
Scriptor: Georgios Trivizias

Illustrations

157 splendid miniatures in the Byzantine style

Former owners

Cardinal Bessarion

Short description

The Treatise on Hunting and Fishing counts as one of the largest and most important Hunting-Manuscripts. It contains the well-known execution of the Greco-Roman writer Oppian of Apamea with dogs and birds on hunt, as well as fishing; all composed for the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius Severus Augustus, known also under the nickname Caracalla. The Treatise is equipped with 157 informative and likewise entertaining, wonderful miniatures in the Byzantine style of the 11th century. The owner of the manuscript in the 15th century, the famous Italian broker of items from Greek antiquity, Cardinal Bessarione, gave the already hundreds of years old manuscript to Georgios Trivizias, who was charged with expanding upon the script. For this reason, a true treasure of book art arose, which is conveyed through the 150 pages of this antique work, featuring hunting and fishing.

Facsimile editions available

Description

Treatise on Hunting and Fishing - Oppiano, Cynegetica

The Treatise on Hunting and Fishing counts as one of the largest and most important Hunting-Manuscripts. It contains the well-known execution of the Greco-Roman writer Oppian of Apamea with dogs and birds on hunt, as well as fishing; all composed for the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius Severus Augustus, known also under the nickname Caracalla. The Treatise is equipped with 157 informative and likewise entertaining, wonderful miniatures in the Byzantine style of the 11th century. The owner of the manuscript in the 15th century, the famous Italian broker of items from Greek antiquity, Cardinal Bessarione, gave the already hundreds of years old manuscript to Georgios Trivizias, who was charged with expanding upon the script. For this reason, a true treasure of book art arose, which is conveyed through the 150 pages of this antique work, featuring hunting and fishing.

A Poet Vaunted by the Emperor

The author of this influential Treatise was Oppian of Apamea, a Greco-Roman poet of the 3rd century. Originally from Syria, he became known when he presented his verses to the Roman Emperor Caracalla, who lauded him considerably for them. This didactic poem, which contains parts that concern themselves with hunting, consists of the basis of the text for the manuscript, which was begun in the 11th century.

Valuable Miniatures in the Naturalist, Byzantine Style

In 157 remarkable miniatures, the Treatise on Hunting and Fishing is impressively illustrated. Many fishing methods are presented, such as the use of nets, hutches, Traps, spears, and lances. The hunters, ever adjoined by their horses and hounds, hunt various animals; be they lions, birds, ducks, game, rabbits, and many more. In wonderful, naturalistic pictures, the scenes with animals and other figures are intertwined with a memorable landscaped background. Alongside that, the depictions of fishing play naturally over open water, where fisherman are seen casting forth their nets. Large swarms of fish populate the dark blue water. Stylistically, the miniatures orient themselves in the lines of Byzantine manuscript art, which demonstrate an astounding naturalism. The Greek text is entertainingly subdivided through detail rich depictions.

A Highlight of the Bessarion Collection

Greek minuscule lettering was added to part of the text in the 15th century. Cardinal Bessarion, in whose possession the manuscript ended up in, gave forth a contract to complete the missing portions of the text. In the middle of the 15th century, this task was executed by the writer Georgios Trivizias, a priest of the Greek community in Venice. Therefore he relied upon the older, original Greek version of the famous text. Basilius Bassarion was a Byzantine Humanist and Theologian of the 15th century, whose life work consisted of spreading Greek culture and the writings of Greek philosophers in the Occident. When this Cardinal Bessarion gave his entire, extensive library as a gift to the city of Venice in 1468, the Treatise also ended up through these means in the Marciana Library, where it has remained as a highlight of the collection through today.

Quick Search
Publisher
Show all options